Property Preservation Specialists with over 20 years experience

Dry Rot

Dry rot is caused by the presence of a fungus (Serpula Lacrymans) and is one of the most serious types of timber decay found in buildings. Dry rot will have occurred due to dampness being present for some time and where the lack of ventilation has allowed decay to continue unchecked.

How will I know if it’s Dry rot?

Often misdiagnosed as some symptoms are similar to that occurring with wet rot which is easier to remedy and not normally as aggressive as dry rot. With a distinctive ‘mushroom’ smell and the softening of timbers the actual fungus can be well concealed behind panelling in studwork or in floor cavities and can be well advanced in its trail of damage before detection.

Timbers will soften and crack with a pattern indicative of chard wood but without the darkening.

Wood becomes lighter in weight and is easily crumbled with a dull brown shade.

There is a distinct smell of mushrooms.

Long white fury growths or grey/white sheets may be visible.

Grey or white strands may be splaying out and if dried these become brittle.

The body of the fungus can be large and fleshy and appears in a ‘bracket’ shape on walls with a white edge and a reddish brown centre (when sporing)

A thin film of red powder can appear.

What can be done?

  • Dry rot can be particularly damaging in buildings and it is essential it is dealt with effectively. The source of the moisture ingress must be identified and removed and damp masonry must be allowed to dry.
  • The full extent and reach of the rot must be identified and all decayed timber must be removed from site and disposed of correctly. Plaster will often require removal and masonry will be subject to chemical treatment. New pre-treated timbers should be introduced and existing undamaged timbers treated with a preservative also.
  • If you have any of the symptoms listed, then please call us today 0800 161 3078 or complete the contact form and we can provide advice or a free of charge survey.